Content Creation for Coaches – Building Personal Connections

A client recently asked me about her content marketing strategy, wondering what she should include in her blog posts and newsletters. She also wanted to understand more clearly what the difference is between the two. Now, she’s a coach who deals with women’s leadership issues who would like to sell more of her workshops. (Wouldn’t we all!)

Regardless of your niche, the most important suggestion I can give you it this – when you create content for your audience, you must offer VALUE. Here’s what I mean…

Blogging for coaches

The best way to think about your blog is that it is a way to showcase your value, expertise, and credibility on all the subjects you hold inside your head. Of course, many of these topics will be the things you present in your workshops, which will generate interest in them.

Blogging about the content in your workshops are great blog topics. The key is to think about all of the topics you use in your coaching, and offer some of those nuggets in your blog posts.

Why? Because that is high-value information that your readers need. Offering some of it up for free in your posts just increases the value to your readers!

For example, I regularly blog about website design, social media, and content marketing, which are all services I offer. Yet, I give much of that information away in blog posts and training videos like this one, because – above all else – I want to offer value. In fact, I’ve created a video on how to develop blog topics to write about at my AmberVilhauer.com website.

So, you should be writing about the topics that are inside your workshops, because that will help you draw potential clients who are interested in the subjects you cover in those workshops.

Newsletters for coaches

If your blog is a series of relatively short articles about subjects that are important to your audience, then your newsletter is more like a digest of everything you have going on: your blog, expert articles, workshops, webinars, new training videos, and more.

I’ve actually created a formula for building a newsletter that has been very effective, and here it is:

  • Open with a personal message – something specific, and significant, that you’re experiencing: an emotional experience, an inspirational thought, or a motivational message that has helped me.
  • Free educational information – perhaps your latest blog post or video training that adds real value for your audience.
  • Promotional material – where you may talk about your upcoming workshop, or your new book.
  • Close with your Bio – offering information about yourself and what you can offer.

Once again, I’ve put together a training video on How to Clear Your Email Marketing Fog, where I explain in more detail how you can structure your email campaign for more success. Here you’ll learn things like how often to send out your newsletter; what time of day to send your emails; when to promote vs. when to give free education. You’ll even learn how to set up your MailChimp emailing service.

In short, think of your newsletter as a way to build a rapport with your audience, to stay connected and begin building a relationship. After all, how often have you been willing to plunk down $1000 for a service from someone you didn’t know? If you want them to hire you, or sign up for a workshop with you, you need to let them get to know you.

Your newsletter, and your blog, are two of the best tools you have to help them do just that. If you let them glimpse who you are and all you have to offer, they’re much more likely to become excited about working with you.

Did this information help you? If so, please help me by sharing this page with others so they can better understand the role of content creation for coaches! Simply click the social media sharing buttons below to impact some lives now!!

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